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another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is educatio
talk about addressing issues like suicide and the extent to which we need to educate the family, um, it's critical that we also broaden that focus with regard to educating all of america with regard to the issues facing this community. so, that there really can be that broad-based community support. i think there is this issue relative to the discussion of suicide, that i had mentioned, that is important. and i think it is the difficulty, the discrimination, and the myths about the way you have to engage to talk about suicide is one thing we have to overcome. and that's particularly true in the military because of the warrior culture. and the military itself is shifting their own philosophy and values and saying it's acceptable to talk now about the fact that you might be considering suicide. you have to understand that that may be going on in the military. and the great thing about the fact that, that military members become depressed, also think about suicide, which is a normative experience in many ways, that what is available is 1-800-273-talk, which is the national suicide preventi
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
that are kind of active in your life. so, i hope that this kind of education that will help people who are victims of violence, actually recognize that they are being exploited that they are in violent situations and it will give them the courage to kind of move out of those situation buzz but what i have found is people who are from the working class and are strained and unemployed, don't have the means to leave abusive situations. president chu made sure that more money goes into this and it is long overdue and so if the experience of me, the experience of the level of discourse around the issue of domestic violence has increased this past year, and then, that is a good thing. you know? and i am glad that more money and more attention is being given to this. i hope that in the future we see more women of color associated with this issue, today i don't see any. there are not any here, aliana lopez had a different perspective she was never brought into the conversation as somebody who was part of the conversation should never have bought into the conversation. and so hopefully, that o
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
the country. because the data shared by our u.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
. but i do believe in education. i believe we should invest in our education systems. smaller classes. no high-capacity schools, because they produce morons. the great and the good want their kids to have the best. you mentioned something that i disagree with. the reason why american consumers consume more than europeans is not a cause of some kind of fundamental cultural difference. what you have -- first, america was the only country that had been effectively untouched by the war. so you had more consumption for durables. i am not sure that americans -- naturally, americans would be the first to enjoy them. then, after that, what you have is a massive reduction in the real wage, the real median wage. i do not know if you know that. today we do not have a real median wage that is anywhere near where it was in 1972. what has been the effect between 1970's and 2008 is that living standards were being pushed into the ground, hours were being expanded to make ends meet. real hourly wages were declining. they were working longer hours. that put enormous strain on families. my friends in
francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions s
with a partner to keep an eye on you. and also, keep an eye for avalanche dang skbrer educate yourself about danger if you see things like cracks in the snow, or notice lower levels that could be the sign of an avalanche. warning to educate yourself if you come here to the sierra. >> thank you so much. the nation is still reeling from a powerful storm that left some in the mid west under white out conditions and spun dozens of tornadoes in the southeast. >> oh mirks god. we need to go. >> the national weather service says a record 34 tornadoes touched down yesterday. they tore buildings and knocked down power lines. not everyone was able to get to safety. >> just making it out there to the food. it starts jerking us and spinning us. >> oh, wow. look at that tornado. two deaths are blamed on the storm. >> a child from daily city killed last night. the victim of a police chase in pasadena that ended in a tragic crash. a woman and boy kill whtd suv police were chasing ran a red light and smashed into their minivan. the suv took off near the scene of a fatal shooting that happened on christmas d
and kindergarten is the new first grade. so it's important to have a great foundation of child-care education. >> you have 30 seconds. >> okay. i would like to speak to the difference between a licensed daycare facility and a licensed childhood center of preschool. many if not most home daycare providers have no social or educational programs for the children in their care. the polka dot preschool -- will be good neighbors, respectful. thank you. >> thank you, we may have questions for you. opening it up to public comment. i have a number of speaker cards. i will call them if you would line up on this side of the room. [ reading speakers' names ] >> hello. my name is john golden. i live across the street from the proposed facility. when i moved to the potrero neighborhood 15 years ago there were bars on the windows on many of the houses and safety was a concern. my neighbors and i have worked very hard to build a home and sense of community in the potrero district and as a matter of fact we were awarded come back neighbor. the thought of increased parking plus the precedent of future co
education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but definitely, we need to create community anchored solu
. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
i came home, he does, so and he had all that information because he had an educated family who knew what was happening, knew what he was going through, knew what to look for, and where to send him. very good. mike. well, and i think one of the things was just brought up is, is the other side of a very positive coin, meaning that there are lots of programs out there now in a position to help. but one of the things you hear from veterans and military families over and over again is there is so much out there that they become overwhelmed. there are so many programs, there is so much information that it really becomes a challenge, um, trying to identify what the right channel of support is for their particular issue, their particular problem. kathryn in, in terms of substance use disorder and mental health issues, behavioral health issues, what is important for families to know and, and how can they help the service member? obviously, jen experienced and, and she's not an isolated case. um, well, i think that the most important thing is for people to, as barbara suggested, to get educat
will say this about the board of education. when i ran for the board of education, i really wanted to represent and make sure i had to be -- had to have a voice in the system. what really surprised me about being on the school board was how much i enjoyed it. i really loved it. i love meeting with families, meeting with teachers, visiting schools, and getting a deeper understanding of how our system works better and doing it with our communities. on that level, it prepared me for a much wider scale,, what it means to work for constituents, and also kind of -- you know, the low interfacing with your colleagues, working with a large bureaucracy to make it happen. it is tough. it is not easy to come before the community organizers -- working with small nonprofits, it was very unfamiliar to me, to slowly move a large glacier. >> are there any other issues that concern you we have not discussed, or any other issues of specific interest you plan to concentrate on? supervisor kim: job growth, economic development. land use. i did to represent one of the most exciting and dynamic districts
kids that have overwhelming compelling educational benefits for them. that is a argument that the university of texas is arguing. that is an exception of non-discrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? okay. i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, the reason the court buys this is because there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not.
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain difference or a picture of a scan or whatever it is, you
my grandchildren to rely on nature is good will to survive. they need an education so they can lead this land. >> the school is funded by a local charity. the goal is to ensure the children still get a basic education. this 8-year-old wants to become an engineer. he says he wants to build a wall to protect bangladesh from slumps. -- from floods. by the time these children become adults, one-third of bangladesh territory will be permanently flooded. the himalayan glacier a, a source of all major rivers in bangladesh, but because of rising temperatures, those glaciers are melting at an unprecedented rate. this, along with deforestation of the continent, causes the rivers downstream to overflow. as bangladesh is a low-lying delta, on average just 1 meter above sea level, people's homes and livelihoods are being destroyed. under these waters is an entire village. seasonal floods and torrential monsoon rains gradually wiped it off the map. all those old enough to have moved away to find work. the young and the elderly have stayed on. this person and his two grandchildren now live on a bo
a lot of non-western ways of trying to have youth identified. we infuse political education so they can make a good choice. there are other programs like oasis. there are not many opportunities, not everybody could work -- all the work permits required. it also requires a social security number. alternative pathways are a good way to go, such as those internship opportunities. use these venues as an opportunity to have kids reflect and make positive choices by leading them to a path of self- determination. >> it is the mayor's youth employment program. the mayor has made a commitment to employ as many youth as possible. that is something that we hope will help. i want to thank all of our panelists today. give them a round of applause. [applause] >> the way we structured this panel, a short presentation to introduce the topic of neuroscience. then we will go to ask questions of all the different members. [applause] >> thank you very much for that kind introduction, for the invitation. i am a narrow scientists. i studied your -- i am a new row scientist. i study your brain. what neuroscie
education or focused on credit scores, as you said. what do you think, and you mentioned working with the groups that are in community such as metta. what do you think is a timeline for working through that process? it may be preliminary to ask, but what are some ideas? would it be new programs that would come out of it or a changed process or something like that? >> those are good points. in terms of being able to utilize prop c dollars as appropriate, we plan to begin working with stakeholders in january for those funds that will be flowing in july. so any new programs or expansion of programs, i think would hopefully be able to begin. as of july 1st. in terms of the structure of those programs, some of the ideas that we have had have been, for example, how do we link our homeownership counseling organizations with other opportunities where families come in to access services? so do we need to link them up with family resource centers? so someone comes in to a family resource center for information about for example, subsidized child-care, that could be an opportunity for som
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
than 200 educators in utah will spend hours getting concealed weapons training. the utah shooting sports council says it normally trains about a dozen teachers each year. the instructions required to legally carry the concealed weapon in public places. in the wake of sandy hook elementary school shooting officials decided to offer this training to educators at no extra charge. >>> it's no wonder that shoppers in one mall were really scared when a huge fight broke out. take a look at this video of shoppers running for their lives. they didn't know what was going on. mall security said about 20 people were involved in yesterday's fight. some of the customers say that they heard loud sounds. they thought maybe it was gunshots and however officials say they found no evidence of any sort of shooting at the mall. reports say that many of the stores did go into lockdown closing their metal gates when the fight started. that mall was -- did reopen a few hours later. >>> well, some heavy rains and tornadoes and snow and powerful storms have been hitting several states. >> coming audiotape
, compelling educational benefits for them. that's it. s it is a what -- that is what the university of texas is arguing. that is the exception to the principle of nondiscrimination that the supreme court has recognized. okay? now, i think that's ridiculous. and, indeed, you know, the reason the court, you know, buys this is because there are social scientists out there who say, no, it's true, it's true. it really happened. now, increasingly these educational benefits -- which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education, you know, at best, are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that there are any eggal benefits. -- educational benefits. but i think it's also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is leaning this way, that even if there are some educational went fits -- benefits, they've got to be weighed against the costs that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination, right? i mean, something as compelling, something, if an interest is compelling, you've got to consider the inherent liabilities in the racial discriminatio
of the universities are earning more than ever. so i think more investment in training and education would help. >> what about the number, 250, 400 or 1 million in terms of where that threshold will be, where taxes will be raised? >> i think that all those numbers matters, but the important thing about the fiscal cliff is there will be a big increase, the payroll deduction will hit all families, middle class, working family. >> the 2%. >> yes. the unemployment extension will end. there's a tremendous amount of taxes that will go on lower income and middle-income americans if it goes into effect. >> let me ask you this, though. in that idea that you've just been describing, then, should middle-class tax rates also be cut? >> i think that would help -- well, we need to reach a consensus. what we saw was sort of policy pa razz. in indiana, they privatized their system, a republican idea that you need to create more incentives. to be frank, it didn't work. in massachusetts the idea was improving education, that's a liberal idea. and that didn't quite work, either. massachusetts has the best educate
it as much as we do. so, i think full compliance is the goal. and to have education, to have free access assessment being done. and then to follow-up by those that are challenged economically, to have loans and to have grants that are made available to have all of them participate in this program is incredibly good for the city. and i think it will help many of the small businesses understand their obligations to respond to these better, but also help them get into compliance better. so, i'm glad to launch this program here on irving street with supervisor chu who has been a really big champion for this. but we have many members of our business community that have also been asking us to do something positive about this. and not let these small businesses become victimized in these drive-by lawsuits. to do what we can to make it a positive thing. so, i'm so glad that joaquin has come aboard to help us. he, having headed up the neighborhood services program for years, now has his talent with todd in making sure that all of the small businesses along these commercial corridors have access t
in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family institute on line and platform for good
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
20 schoolchildren and six female educators. gun sales are on the increase. according to maryland state police, and in november there were more than 7200 gun purchase applications filed. >> we are projecting over 8200 purchase applications for december to be processed. >> more than 46,000 applications were processed and at the end of 2012, state police project at least 62,000 will be handled. troopers will not speculate on why, but some reasons are apparent. the holiday season, high-profile crimes, and lawmakers who advocate measures to change on lot. >> i think when people see school children slaughtered, they get the message that something has to change. that is our hope. >> according to fbi crime statistics, last year maryland had 398 murders. to hundred 62 were committed by people using firearms. 260 to happen by way of handguns. 3 by unknown firearms. >> i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put an armed police officer in every single school. >> that is the security stance of the national rifle association. in a texas school distr
to account in "san francisco chronicle" he feared influx that it might dilute the educational experience for the business students. i'll a valid concern, say experts who suggest the admission board rely as much on rig louse language screening as on test scores. >> it could go smoothly. it takes training on part of the staff. >> elsewhere on campus, where the number of chinese students pursuing american education is on expected to grow. >> more and more students come and want an opportunity here. >> claudia cowen, fox news. >> doug: from ghost town to boom town. california was population 1. just 25 years ago. the town is going high-tech in major way. anita vogel explains. >> he happened on a town. >> distressed and the hotel had been condemned by the county. a structure. none of the buildings work. >> cal it can trained gee jol gist bought the town for $200,000 and spent 25 years and $1 million to restore it. installing solar panels. the town has a mini boom. >> it has blossomed from 60 residents. they stream in the area to see the solar installations. rare earth minding expanded in the h
1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
behavior out there and utilize resources such as education systems, our community jobs programs, others that might allow people to go in different direction. the unfortunate and very tragic incident in connecticut in sandy hook elementary school of course heightened everybody's awareness of what violence can really be all about. and as we have been not only responding, reacting to this national tragedy that i think president obama has adequately described as broken all of our hearts, and in every funeral that has taken place, for those 20 innocent children and six innocent adults in the school districts, and school administrators, we obviously have shared in that very tragic event, all of us. it has touched everybody across this country. san francisco is no different. and i have shared that emotional experience with the supervisor and everybody here, in our law enforcement, and in our health department as well. the question for us, then, is what do we do about it? and not only can we share in this tragedy and signal our sympathies to the families as we've done, but we've got to do somet
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
an education -- [applause] >> i guess the question is of fairness. you shouldn't have two systems, one where based on your race or class you can access treatment and move on with your life and another one where because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma
children and teens about the subject and get educated on the subject yourself so you can learn how it handle it and really talk to your children about it can be fun, it can be dangerous, these new toys that we have. >> wow. all right, i'd like to introduce the members of our panel today, rob is here, rob, could you come on up, rob neighbor, please join us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. families will te
of diversity and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. similarly if we want to get down to the local level and address this issue, we've got to teach our kids that the sooner that you embrace difference and understand that your muslim classmate or your seat classmate or your gay classmate or your limited english professor classmate might be tomorrow's ceo or today's best friend of yours, the better off we will be. you have a leg up, having done about 30 jury trials across this country and seen interactions between people of diverse backgrounds. >> and here we try to celebrate, not just embrace, our diversity. celebrate all our interesting diversity but also celebrate the things that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or d
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
forward so you can start figuring tthinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> 11 minutes after 5:00 right now. new video this morning of a dangerous christmas day tornado that ripped through alabama. surveillance video from a walgreens store in mobile shows the twister from two different angles. you can see the sparks and the twister also moved two vehicles. things were back to normal at the store except the doors they were all boarded up. the assistant store manager there is thankful that nobody was seriously hurt. >> i've never been in a war zone but i'm sure this is what it looks like. there's a bunch of tin. all the stuff that was lifted off the buildings over here in the parking lot. just broken glass everywhere. >> the national weather service says the tornado that hit mobile was an ef 2 and it packed winds of about 135 miles per hour and officials say that the twister was 6 miles long, 200 yards wide. >> unbelievable storm right there. >>> mike, t
more off the free stuff. another thing that i would do would change the education system to where in your senior year and you decide whether you will go on to college or be a blue-collar worker. if you are going to be a blue- collar worker, you go into apprenticeships for the last year of high school plan that particular field, because now these high school people get out of high school and they don't know how to change a light bulb and they end up not having a skill and they don't have the money to go to school for whatever reason and they don't learn a skill. so they end up on the welfare system. if you took that last year of high school and taught them a skill, then they would have a skill and able to earn money and not go on welfare. host: let's leave it there, jim. on facebook -- brad in victorville, california. good morning. are you with us? last chance. we will move on to doreen in connecticut. caller: i'm a small business owner. host: what kind of business? caller: i do alterations. in the evening return our business into a zumba class for ladies. my daughter and i seem to
that the american people are ignorant t used to be the media would say if only we had a more educated public. now they are getting educated on the story, and, no, it's not a story. >> this is a very serious case obviously. a lot of people disheart ended there wasn't a more thorough investigation and sitting on documents and not coming forward with what the american people needed to know. and benghazi, this story is still going on, the investigation, who is going to testify, who is not. and still more questions than answers. >> amazing. there is a guy in jail because of a video that was blamed for these riots and for this horrible, horrible tragedy. the real scandal is why did they push this video? and if one person could just answer that question. it wasn't a mistake. they did it on purpose. was it because they wanted get president obama about off the hook for his statements about al-qaeda in who knows. susan rice isn't the story. hillary's head injury isn't a story although it's a strange part of the story. the real scandal is who pushed the video and why the media? the media became the three mo
the victims are primarily black and brown. but i think you have high unemployment. you have poor education you have communities broken apart and creates perfect storm and culture in this country almost the norm and we have become immune to it we can't get immune to children dying in ourl: all right. in cities like new york and some other towns across the country, the murder rate is coming down. all right? it's not as bad as it used to be. >> right. >> bill: and a variety of reasons for that community policing, come stat, the computer. in chicago it's going the other way. so there must be something in the windy city, is it gang, narcotic violence? is that's what's going on there? is that what is driving this stuff. >> i think gangs is part of it. we have a new police chief now. i think he is doing a good job bringing about a lot of new strategies. proliferation of guns. there is more guns than there are computers. that's an issue. we had have to break this code of silence where people are afraid to speak up. we have got to get communities engaged and empowered again. police can do a piece of th
year tradition. it has to go to make way for higher education. >> reporter: three generations order lunch maybe for the last time year. >> always order the number 24 and i still do. >> it opened in 1977 will serve it's last meal december 29th. >> long time customers are sighing good-bye to the owner. >> it's going to be sad to see them go. >> for a new building they will demolish the restaurant. >> with it's numbered menu, handwritten orders and nothing over $9 disappear. >> he has spent most of his life in the restaurant. now as customers clamber more him to find a new location, he says he's not so sure. >> no plans yet. but maybe to take a little break. >> reporter: many fans have eaten here since childhood. >> this is the west guy in the world. >> reporter: so how to succeed for 35 years? >> very hard hard working people and we care about people. i think that's what it is. >> reporter: that and a good burrito. >> going over the fiscal cliff. raising taxes on us. lowlowering on corporations. plus a special delivery on christmas day. the bay area family that unexpectly had to do it
are cheating, you told her. >> educated guess. [ laughing ] [ talking over each other ] >> i want a recount. >> 4:45. >>> embarcadero with the lights on beautiful drive into the city when you can see this especially against the backdrop of dry weather which is what we have. cloud cover stubborn kept temperatures up and frost from forming in many areas. let's talk about temperatures 40 livermore and fairfield, 41 concord. 42 napa. 43 san jose everybody else mid to upper 40s, half moon bay 50. 50 monterey, everybody else in the upper 30s to mid 40s around the bay and inland. brighter and dry today, light rain possible tomorrow and lingering showers saturday, very, very small storm, moisteÑ starved storm may be a better way to say it, dry pattern more than one day, sunday through tuesday. high pressure is dominating our weather. a lot of moisture in the middle parts of the atmosphere, as this high moves in and takes over today, we won't have rain and we'll have mostly sunny conditions. by tomorrow evening, we are starting to see steadier rain develop, we'll have sprinkles tomorrow morning thr
to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a land of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ - hi, neighbour! come on in! i can't wait to go play at jungle beach today! and... prince wednesday's here! - hello, hello, hello. it's me, prince wednesday. i have my royal pail, and i have my royal shovel, and i'm
. let's remember now, we have seen this year education budgets cut. we don't have money to give teachers raises. we had a teachers strike in chicago. we don't have money to do things that teachers need, but we'll find money to arm them, to train them, to buy them guns, ammunition. what are we saying? so we can arm teachers, but we can't give teachers money to give them the ability to be better educators? to me that's the wrong message to send. >> two sides are looking for meaningful contributions. the fact there was a gun buy-back program, the day after christmas, 1500 rifles and handguns were taken back by police in exchange for groceries and a cash back program there in los angeles. hugely successful. meanwhile, arizona's attorney general is proposes a voluntary programs where schools would arm at least one staff member. meanwhile, there's a gun group in utah offers a free concealed weapons course to public schoolteachers today. as we look for federal solution for this, and answers from our elected leaders, is it really the onus being on the local school districts right now to protect
night to try to educate you if i didn't think it was not just theoretically possible but actually feasible for the vast majority of people to succeed at managing their own money. so if that's the case, then why is investing so darn difficult? how come so many people struggle to make money in the stock market? how the heck can i believe it possible for you to beat the averages, the big benchmarks, when so many people and fund managers fail to do so? simple. you can do it but you have to do it the right way. one of the biggest obstacles to successful investing is a lack of clarity about just what investing is supposed to mean. i have seen countless people try to follow the conventional wisdom about money management, only to have their investments wiped out because the conventional wisdom is wrong. and the worst part is those people had no idea they were making a mistake. they actually thought they were being responsible. in other words, to borrow a phrase from "cool hand luke" -- >> what we've got here is failure to communicate. >> and i'm saying it boss. that's why tonight i want t
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